King Cobra of Texas Motorcycle News

Highlights!

  • More power, more torque, less weight, smaller package…better from every angle.
  • ‘No-compromise’ torque curve – Massive amounts of low-end torque for launching off the gate and out of corners, AND classic Cobra motorcycle over-rev that provides that ‘2nd gear’ for wide-open situations.
  • New off-plane tuned expansion chamber. Packages tight features a D-shaped header for minimal flow losses. Next-generation 5Gx Freewheeling Clutch. Precision engagement, durable, freewheels for increased corner speed, and easier starting.
  • Cobra Friction Drive increases driveline durability and improves traction over rough terrain.
  • Improved maintainability. Easier to do just about everything (top ends, drain the coolant, check CFD, etc)
  • Check out this post on the best motorcycle rides in Texas. highlighting the best motorcycling roads in Central Texas.

 

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2020 CX50JR

 

+ All-new SKF fork seal & swiper…This world-class combo drastically reduces friction and stiction, and they are also the most durable seals on
the market!
+ Improved steering head sealing. New seals and spacers are designed to keep out even the most invasive water and mud.
+ Improved exhaust system mounting. Softer mounts for improved durability.
+ Black, hard-anodized wheels…Tougher and better looking!

 

 

2020 CX50SR (The King)

 

+ New CARD rear shock with all-new dual adjustable high and low-speed compression adjuster.
+ All-new SKF fork seal & swiper…This world-class combo drastically reduces friction and stiction, and they are also the most durable seals on the market!
+ Improved steering head sealing. New seals and spacers are designed to keep out even the most invasive water and mud.
+ Improved exhaust system mounting. Softer mounts for improved durability.
+ Black, hard-anodized wheels…Tougher and better looking!

 

2020 CX65

 

+ New CARD rear shock with all-new dual adjustable high and low-speed compression adjuster.
+ All-new stainless steel rear brake caliper piston keeps brake fluid cooler and eliminates fluid boiling and loss of pedal feel.
+ All new primary and secondary transfer ports for improved power throughout the RPM range.
+ Improved steering head sealing. New seals and spacers are designed to keep out even the most invasive water and mud.
+ All-new shift cassette improves shift feel and makes neutral easier to find.
+ Black anodized front and rear hubs.
+ Improved exhaust system mounting. Softer mounts for improved durability.
+ New silicone rubber inlet boot provides improved intake flow and easier jetting changes.
+ All-new kick start shaft narrows the engine profile and reduces weight.
+ Improved clutch hub provides for a longer-lasting clutch.
+ All-new clutch master cylinder offers improved lever feel and utilizes mineral oil for improved durability.

 

Featured Products

King and Junior Brake Levers

Have you ever had a crash or a tip-over completely destroy your brake lever? By installing the new ASV brake lever on a King or Junior, the worry will be over. The special pivot design pivots outward on impact and springs back instantly.

 

Precision Motorcycle Products

King Cobra of Texas is proud to announce that we have become a Precision Products dealer. The fit was right with them being a Texas company and carrying the best in Sprockets. We’re really happy to be involved with PMP so check it out and if you need sprockets for any bike big or little give us a call and we’ll be happy to help you out.

 

The Biggest Mistakes New Riders Make

You did it. You’ve decided you want to ride a motorcycle. That’s awesome! Welcome to a great community of riders and enthusiasts! You may have even gone out and bought some gear. We have all been “newbies” at one point, I get it. You’re probably excited to get out there and maybe a little nervous too. But heading out for a ride without really thinking about what you’re getting yourself into is asking for trouble, or worse, a trip to the hospital. Mistakes can be embarrassing at best and for the most part easily avoidable. So to help you out, I’ve put together a list of the most common mistakes new riders make.

Not Taking A Rider Course

Not taking a basic rider course, or worse yet, not having any training at all is a huge no-no. It’s not only dangerous for you but for other riders as well. What you’ll learn in one weekend will teach you the essentials of safe riding. And there are perks to taking the class. Most insurance companies will give you a discount, and in most cases, you can do your road test at the end of your class instead of at the DMV.

Buying A Big New Bike

I know it’s tempting to get that big, beautiful motorcycle right off the showroom floor, but please don’t. As a new rider, you don’t need all the power of a big powerful machine right away. Buy a good, used starter motorcycle. You’re new, and there will probably be tip-overs and scratches. Find out if riding a motorcycle is really what you want to do. If not sell it. If you’re still loving it after 1,000 miles, then you can always upgrade to a bigger bike.

Not Doing A Safety Check

The Basic Rider Course will show you how important this is before you ride. New riders and seasoned ones alike tend to ignore it, but it can be a disaster if your tires are under-inflated or if your brake lights don’t work. Also, check the gas tank and make sure you have enough so you don’t get embarrassed because you ran out on the side of the road. Two minutes could save your dignity and your life.

Not Wearing Protective Gear

The right gear can save your life and help prevent more serious injuries. Spend the money and do it right the first time. Of course, nothing out there will totally protect you, but a good motorcycle jacket, boots, gloves, armor, and a helmet—all with high visibility—will help get you past your beginner riding days.

Too Much, Too Soon

I know you are excited. I was too! Hell, I still get excited at the thought of getting out for a good ride. But you’re not ready for every riding condition or situation just yet. As a new rider, you aren’t even sure what your skill level really is, let alone when overdoing it. Statistically, out riding your skill level is a leading cause of solo motorcycle crashes. Get some practice in increasing levels of difficulty, but only when you’re ready. Don’t start out riding in the city in rush-hour traffic. Take your time and ride around less traveled roads and neighborhoods. Ride at your current skill level and then when you feel like you’ve progressed in skill and awareness, step it up a notch.

Not Gauging Traffic

Anticipate the soccer mom in the SUV, on a cell phone, changing lanes right in front of you. You know she is going to do it so keep your distance and stay upright. You have to be far more aware of how traffic flows, road conditions, and pedestrians.  The roads hide quite a lot of dangers including reckless drivers, animals, and kids. Stay alert and watch for the unforeseen.

Assuming Everyone Can See You

You should assume you are invisible to everyone around you. Assume that people will cut you off in traffic, pedestrians will walk into your path, and you’ll just plain be ignored whenever the opportunity presents itself. Even though you are aware of the other motorists around you and have acknowledged their presence in your surroundings, the same cannot be said about them.

Having A Passenger Before You’re Ready

No matter how much your friends or anyone beg you to take them for a ride on your bike, don’t. At least not until you’ve honed your skills well enough to be able to counteract the extra weight you’ll have onboard. Also, make sure you know how to instruct your passenger if it’s his or her first ride.

 

The first few hundred miles you ride are exciting and even a little nerve-racking. As with any pastime, there’s a learning curve, but you’ve got this! Just stay alert and take your time. Most of all, have fun and I’ll be seeing you down the road!